SRC Ford Capri RS 2600

SRC Ford Capri RS 2600

Postby wixwacing » Thu 22 Feb, 2018 12:17 pm

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SRC Ford Capri RS 2600
European Touring Car Championship
24 Hr du Spa -1971


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by Phil Wicks

Ever since the French invented motor racing there has been some kind of four wheeled motor sport combat somewhere in Europe, and with the technical advances made to vehicles during the war years it was inevitable that multifarious products would be required to go head to head on the disused WW2 Airfields across the continent.


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For some this was not enough and the more adventurous decided to revive the pre war point to point style of racing, from one town to the next. This eventually became touring car racing and from the end of the fifties a breed of racer racing what ostensibly was an ‘off the showroom floor’ model took to the country lanes. Rallying shares these roots and it is about this time that the two disciplines separated and went their independent ways.


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There are a string of modern circuits which owe their existence to this style of racing and although most of the circuits have since closed, we still can enjoy 6 , 12, and 24 hour events across the globe. Spa Francorchamps has been an on again , off again venue for a long time, being shortened over the years from a 15 km circuit to the current 7 km circuit. For the 1971 Spa meeting it was a 14 km circuit.


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For this model SRC have opted to reproduce one of the legendary cars from a legendary race. Notably the winning Ford Capri RS 2600 from the 1971 Spa 24 hour race. The real thing was a rework of the Ford Capri RS, equipped with a 2873 c.c. Ford V6 as driven by Alex Solder-Roig and Dieter Glemser. After a grueling race of attrition and with nearly two thirds of the field retired, the Capri came home in first place with a bit over three laps to spare!


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SRC look to have taken painstaking measures to produce a potentially very nice model, This they have achieved admirably with the external detail. Tampo is excellent and front and rear lights are particularly well modeled down to the race number light on the boot. We even get a detailed exhaust system where it can’t be seen (unless you end up on your roof)! Posed acrylic door glasses and fine detail like the anodized gutter trims, plus the wheels make it a very attractive car.


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But I digress, there has been a lot of time and thought put into the mechanics of this model, there are some new ideas and there are some tried and tested ideas incorporated, some work and unfortunately some don’t (without extra work being carried out). Let’s see what we get for our money.





The SRC CHRONO system is a system which like some others, offers an array of options in the set up of the model. Ideally, giving the racer the opportunity of setting the model up to optimum for the home track; or likewise, for the local club track. There is also the variation in spares which allow the modeler to adjust the model to suit a number of differing circuit applications.


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Slot Racing Company


There is the option of three different types of motor and likewise variations in motor pods to accommodate the motor of choice. That choice extends to two 12 volt long can motors; The M3 @ 17,000 rpm and the M6 @ 20,000 rpm. This particular model came with the ‘S’ can variant 12 volt ‘C2’ motor rated @ 26,000 rpm. and to be quite honest, I ran the model on a non magnet technical track only the other day; and whereas I was expecting the model to be a ball of fire, but after some adjustment listed below,it was quite tame and drove marginally better than a regular Scaley ‘S’ can.


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Almost all else is optional, with a selection of springs for the chassis pod mounts and another set for the guide. There are various weight and shaped ballast weights available for the non magnet racer and a selection of in line and anglewinder pods to suit your motor choice. Strangely enough you also get a choice of ‘soft’ ‘medium’ or ‘hard’ chassis, but you’ll need to check out the website link for the full range of options.


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So, back at the model it’s time to see how good it really is. With the top off it is easy to check out fits and tolerances and there was a bit to do on this model. Firstly the guide return spring is vestigial. If it were mine I would mount the guide without a spring and shim it till it is just slack on the setup block. I would also change the braids for slightly softer tinned braid. Strangely enough, the guide blade is tapered lengthways front to back by about 0.5 m.m.?


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Racing Sports Cars


Also with the guide I feel there is too much rotational travel. There are no self centering devices on the guide and the lead wires need accurate setting to ensure the guide returns near to centre. This will pay dividends and be marshall proof for reslotting. I recently lost a race when a marshall took five or more seconds to reslot my model after a last lap deslot!


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The pod is fairly effective and sits well in the chassis, but, ….the motor is significantly loose in its pod mounts. Even when the overhead motor brace is tight the motor can be moved with very little effort. This is unacceptable for non magnet racing, and juddering on hard acceleration may well prove a problem.


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Another issue in this area is the traction magnet, this is a great magnet which produces enough downforce for the average race track, but….once again it is loose, experience tells me that in a non magnet incident the magnet is able to come loose and attach itself to other important motive parts; likewise in a magnet track incident, which may not be the driver’s fault, once the car leaves the rails the magnet is loose and unrestrained, again, leaving the potential for the magnet to become a loose cannon inside the model, trust me…….it has happened!


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Towards the rear we see a couple of brass bushes that retain the rear axle, but once again they are not a tight fit in the pod. Again after a heavy deslot or over enthusiastic marshalling, one or both could pop out quite unannounced (again, trust me!), but these things are not significant if the model is destined for the shelf.


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All the rims are alloy and there are no issues apparent with them. Tyres are fine and fronts seem a bit harder than the rears which, if so, is a good idea. Rear tyres are very thin too and are reasonably concentric. But here, another couple of issues arise. I have to make the assumption that this model was primarily designed to be an in line drive. The rear axle wheels and tyres and gears have been shoe horned into place and on this model the spur gear was digging heavily into the tyre rubber, and the spur and pinion gears were out of line allowing the pinion to only half mesh with the spur! I made a fine shim to space out the spur gear from the axle bush and ran the axle for ten minutes before filing a shallow chamfer on the outside of the pinion and chamfered the tyre inner edge to reduce the tyre contact with the pinion to acceptable levels,


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Both front and rear tyres are very thin and it may be necessary to glue the rear tyres to the hubs to eliminate centrifugal forces throwing them off! The overall rear wheel/tyre dimension is Ø 18.4 m.m., the spur gear is Ø 18.00 leaving almost nothing for tyre truing! Mmmmmmm? While still at the back end you will need two Allen keys to work on the axle. The wheel Allen screws are a 1.25 m.m. drive while the spur screw is a 0.9 m.m. drive? And finally and not a bad thing, I notice the rear tyres are marked Scaleauto. When reassembling note also that the body and pod screws vary in length


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Just to finish up there is small bag attached to the display case, Apart from a couple of photo etched wipers there are some strange shaped items which even the SRC web site does not appear to display?? They look like the quick release rubber bonnet catches that race cars of this era sported, but the model already has chrome bonnet lynch pins as part of the detail?


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Ford Capris on eBay


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So once a reasonable state of set up was achieved I decided to take it to a local medium length technical track for a shake down. The model drove well and even in the non magnetic set up was quite steady in the corners. As mentioned before the motor did not come across as a 26,000 rpm motor. but more testing will either confirm or repudiate that claim. For non magnet racing I would get the model weight up to 90 grams or more with a 45/55 split between front and rear. For sweeping tracks I would take the weight up to the high nineties with the same weight distribution split. For magnet racing keep it light and tyres glued and trued


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The model was lent to me buy a fellow racer for the purpose of setting it up, something hopefully I have achieved. Another test this coming Saturday will again confirm or otherwise any success. This is a fabulous looking model and at the right price I would consider one for the shelf but I’m not sure if it could ever be an out and out racer, time will tell.


Many thanks to fellow Eagleby racer Mark for the opportunity to play with this model.
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When I'm not racing slotcars,
I'm out in the back yard, burning food!!

When I win, it's because of my talent, not my car or my controller!
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